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Welcome to City Marque Vauxhall Serviced Apartments

Address: 59 Bondway, Lambeth, SW8 1SJ

Hotel Description

Situated 5 minutes’ walk from Vauxhall underground and rail station, City Marque Vauxhall Serviced Apartments offers apartments with fully fitted kitchens and free WiFi. Many riverside cafés and bars can be found a 5-minute walk-away. A dishwasher, microwave and oven are featured in the modern kitchen, as well as a fridge/freezer and washing machine. A flat-screen TV and sofa are provided in the lounge. London’s West End can be reached in 8 minutes via tube from Vauxhall station. The Oval Cricket Ground and Tate Britain are both a 10-minute walk from the property while historic riverside Battersea Park is a 25-minute stroll away.

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Attractions - City Marque Vauxhall Serviced Apartments

Goldsmith International Business School - University

Goldsmith International Business School - University

Distance 0.29 miles (0.46 km)
Goldsmith IBS aims to transform and support your career aspirations. At Goldsmith IBS, we continuously seek to enhance our quality standards and internal working processes in furtherance of your quest for a successful career in accounting, finance, management, strategy, information systems and other related disciplines. We hope you find the information in this website useful in making a decision to join us.

Royal Horticultural Halls and Conference Centre - Exhibition

Royal Horticultural Halls and Conference Centre - Exhibition

Distance 0.78 miles (1.25 km)
The Royal Horticultural Halls and Conference Centre is centrally located in the "heart of Westminster", London and comprises two very fine exhibition and event Halls and a Conference Centre. This important and well-established multi-purpose events venue enjoys a prime location in an attractive residential area of Central London. The combination of its three facilities offers maximum flexibility for event organisers both in terms of space and application. The venue has an unrivalled track record of hosting all manner of events from trade and consumer fairs to corporate events and conferences. The venue has become a recognised centre for niche market, sectoral and new launch events. For examples of these please refer to our list of events.

Big Ben - London - Landmark

Big Ben - London - Landmark

Distance 1 miles (1.6 km)
The clock tower looks spectacular at night when the four clock faces are illuminated.
Each dial is 23 feet square (49.15 square metres)
Big Ben's minute hands are 14 feet long (4.26 metres)
The figures on the face of Big Ben are two feet high (0.6 metres)
A special light above the clock faces is also illuminated, letting the public know when parliament is in session.
Big Ben's timekeeping is strictly regulated by a stack of coins placed on the huge pendulum. Big Ben has rarely stopped. Even after a bomb destroyed the Commons chamber during the Second World War, the clock tower survived and Big Ben continued to strike the hours.

The chimes of Big Ben were first broadcast by the BBC on 31 December 1923, a tradition that continues to this day.
The Palace of Westminster was destroyed by fire in 1834. In 1844, it was decided the new buildings for the Houses of Parliament should include a tower and a clock. The bell was refashioned in Whitechapel in 1858 and the clock first rang across Westminster on 31 May 1859.
Just two months later, Big Ben cracked. A lighter hammer was fitted and the bell rotated to present an undamaged section to the hammer. This is the bell as we hear it today.
The origin of the name Big Ben is not known, although two different theories exist.
The first is that is was named after Sir Benjamin Hall, the first commissioner of works, a large man who was known affectionately in the house as "Big Ben".
The second theory is that it was named after a heavyweight boxing champion at that time, Benjamin Caunt. Also known as "Big Ben", this nickname was commonly bestowed in society to anything that was the heaviest in its class.

Houses of Parliament - Country Home

Houses of Parliament - Country Home

Distance 1.03 miles (1.64 km)
The Houses of Parliament, otherwise known as The Palace of Westminster, stands on the site where Edward the Confessor had the original palace built in the first half of the eleventh century. In 1547 the royal residence was moved to Whitehall Palace, but the Lords continued to meet at Westminster, while the commons met in St. Stephen's Chapel. Ever since these early times, the Palace of Westminster has been home to the English Parliament. In 1834 a fire broke out which destroyed much of the old palace, all that remained was the chapel crypt, The Jewel Tower and Westminster Hall. It was Lord Melbourne, the Prime Minister, who saved the great hall by arranging for the fire engines to be brought right into the hall and personally supervising the fire fighting operation.